The heavens declare the glory of God;
the skies proclaim the work of his hands.
-Psalm 19:1

Do you know that God controls the clouds and makes his lightning flash?
-Job 37:15



Thursday, September 25, 2008

To be or not to be... Kyle, that is the question.

It's Sky Watch Friday post time!! (Please visit Tom, Klaus, Sandy and Imac's SKY WATCH BLOG (click here or on the logo) to participate in Sky Watch Fridays. It is so interesting to see skies from all over the world!!! I highly recommend not just checking it out, but consider participating! It's a truly great group of people!!!) Thanks to everyone who offered such encouraging and kind words regarding my intro to sky watch last week. It truly is an honor being a part of such an inspirational group of folks. For my sky watch post here today, I have chosen to post a picture I took during a mini-storm chase last April, when I had my own little storm cell develop and mature with beautiful structure. South of me, the storm produced a brilliant green sky, but in the early stages it was this beautiful cumulonimbus cloud (calvus type)...

Cumulonimbus (Cb) is a type of cloud that is tall, dense, and involved in thunderstorms and other intense weather. The clouds can form alone, in clusters, or along a cold front in a squall line. Cumulonimbus clouds form from cumulus clouds (namely from cumulus congestus) and can further develop to a supercell, a severe thunderstorm with special features. ~source
I was thrilled to be able to catch that patch of wisteria with the swelling cumulus blurred (Bokeh, thanks, Beth!) in the background... hadn't realized how beautiful wisteria blossoms were up close until that point. I wrote about this little spontaneous chase back in April... and gave the fully detailed account. Today, let me just say that the memories are alive in my heart, like it just happened yesterday. It's amazing how memorable that day was even though it was just a little storm cell... nothing too impressive by typical storm chasing standards... just a little thunderhead that I watched from infancy to dissipation. I guess that sort of makes it my baby...Onto the crazy Atlantic basin tropics... As I've been mentioning, there are two disturbances that all the weather geeks, such as myself, are keeping a close eye on. In fact, the National Hurricane Center has issued a Special Tropical Disturbance Statement to cover both. One, just off the coast of the Carolinas is producing huge waves (I have heard up to 18' waves) and tropical storm force winds. Unfortunately, our team member, Mikey, who lives on the Virginia Coast, is currently in Huntington Beach, CA?!!!!... He is, however, getting updates from his wife, who has let him know that water is now two blocks from his house. He is due home tonight. Hopefully, flight delays won't prevent his return, and he will be able to offer us a full update. Currently, that disturbance (frontal-born low) has not gained sufficient tropical characteristics to be named, so it is being considered more of a nor'easter type storm rather than a tropical system, at this time...
THIS SYSTEM COULD DEVELOP INTO A SUBTROPICAL OR TROPICAL CYCLONE BEFORE THE SYSTEM MOVES INLAND ALONG THE ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERN U.S. COAST ON FRIDAY. REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT THIS SYSTEM BECOMES A SUBTROPICAL OR TROPICAL CYCLONE... STRONG WINDS...COASTAL FLOODING...HIGH SURF... AND DANGEROUS RIP CURRENTS WILL CONTINUE ALONG PORTIONS OF THE SOUTHEASTERN AND MID-ATLANTIC U.S. COASTAL REGIONS DURING THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS.
The other system is the one that has been dumping swimming pools worth of water on Puerto Rico, causing mudslides and flooding with their over 30" in some parts of that region, just over the past week, while that tropical "disturbance" held position directly over them. Fortunately, that system has finally shown signs of movement and appears to be pulling away from Puerto Rico with its very asymmetrical shape with its sites set on northern New England. Depending on how quickly things move, these two systems COULD impact the same area at the same time... which would be a bad thing for the northeast (as Mikey said, Perfect Storm). This one could also become a named system in the coming days... so technically, we could be looking at Kyle AND Laura in the making.

5:00PM Update: Thanks to Jess for the update on Tropical Storm Kyle. Looks like the Puerto Rico system won.

Hope everyone's day is great!!!
~Dewdrop

81 comments:

  1. wouldn't that be something, watching the birth of what could be a great storm. The Carolina's sure could use the rain.

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  2. I really love the third photo...the silhouette of the tree and that amazing cloud...very cool!

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  3. Happy skywatching time again. Love your photos. The third one is to die for. So calming, so perfectly beautiful.

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  4. Dewd!! Look at you! Very happy for you - and good to see you here every week.

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  5. Wow! Fabulous photo! Love it... VERY much!

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  6. WOW! That is stunning shots!~Mine is posted HERE too. Happy SWF!~

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  7. Again gorgeous clouds, love them.

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  8. Loved the Wisteria.

    Nice weather post and information. Always fun to visit here.

    Come visit,
    Troy

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  9. OH NO! Not Kyle and Laura. Haven't we seen enough storms this season? ;-) Thanks for another lesson, Dewdrop!

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  10. Thanks very much for the interesting tutorial on these kinds of storm clouds, and the photo examples. Much appreciated.

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  11. Mighty fine work Dewdrop, also the pics are eye catching too.
    Great post.

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  12. Thank you again Dew...
    Great intro lesson gain this week and you then take the time and effert to do another great post... You are a star and I'm sure all this weeks Sky Watchers appreciate your work.

    Tom

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  13. wow this is so interesting I love it all thanks!Great info:)

    This weekend we are going on a BIG SAILINGBOAT, I show this great OLD boat on my blog,Please visit JoAnn:

    www.joannwalraven.blogspot.com

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  14. Beautiful photos and a fascinating write up.

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  15. My Dew: What a beautiful capture with the flower. Now if you see a face in the clouds I'll know we have influenced you for the better. Thanks for all the tech info.

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  16. I love the shot of the flower with the clouds on the background. Very creative!

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  17. Wow, your clouds look like something one could pick out and eat! Yes, like cotton candies!! And its so white and clean! Thanks for the informative post.

    Happy SWF.
    Visiting from Vienna Daily.

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  18. wonderful photos and its fun learning more about the clouds we love watching :)

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  19. I love the wisteria with the cloud behind it.

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  20. These are beautiful photos!
    I have wisteria and yes, it is beautiful and very fragrant.
    Great info too!

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  21. Wow - I wasn't expecting another whole set of photos. These are great.

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  22. Those are all great shots and such an informative post. I love the way you photographed the wisteria against the sky. Remarkable shot.

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  23. the wisteria is certianly dramatic against that puffy cloud, you've captured its mood brilliantly

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  24. You did it again!Fantastic:o)

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  25. A great collection of magnificent clouds!

    Love the wisteria shot. :-)

    Thank you for the Tornado link,
    very exiting picture essay!

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  26. The first pic is outstanding. Thanks for sharing

    Cheers

    http://reginainpictures.blogspot.com/

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  27. What a great idea to shoot the flower against that huge cloud! It's so dramatic and contrasting moods.
    Nice you thought of the April storm as your baby.
    Thanks for stopping by. I finally posted a SkyWatch under the influence of the Beatles. :)

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  28. I also love the photo with the flower against the big white cloud! Happy SWF!

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  29. Here, we learn about weather and see beautiful shots.
    Thanks.
    PSW. In Southern Brazil, weather has changed and subtropical cyclones has occurred.

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  30. Such beautiful rolling clouds! I especially love the dramatic touch of wisteria before white clouds!

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  31. Lovely photos. The birth of a storm. We do not get big storms here in Crete, Greece, but soon there will be rain, that's for sure.

    Ray

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  32. Nothing like biething your own private thunderstorm with a bunch of flowers for the effort!Great post, I always love your explanations. Thanks.

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  33. Thank you dear Dewdrop for these precious informations and beautiful photos! I live thousands of miles away from the USA, in another part of the world, but I'm very impressed by your detailed information, by your "love" for stormchasing, by your intense knowledge! Have a very nice Friday and week-end! :-)

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  34. Beautiful wisteria/cloud photo, Dewdrop! And, wonderful information, as ususal!

    I've already left you a comment on the SWF home page; that is a great shot of the wall cloud.

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  35. Not only stunning photos but such in-depth information each time!!! Many thanks.

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  36. Great the first few look like giant cotton balls.I just love to look at clouds you see such interesting things.

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  37. Here, we learn and enjoy!!
    Thank you for sharing.

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  38. Wow, those are striking!
    Great photos! Really enjoy your site.
    Nina at Nature Remains

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  39. Sky beautiful! But the flower is better!!!!

    Santilli

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  40. You always astound me. These are wonderful shots. The first is pure magic!

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  41. Love the title. Great intro again on the skywatch blog. You have to be one of the most educational bloggers and possbily the one who puts the most effort into this each week. You're a star missy nad these shot rock!

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  42. Nice photo and beautiful flower.

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  43. That first shot is awesome- very nice .

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  44. there are all beautiful and lots of drama there

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  45. That is a super shot! Looks like you can reach out and touch it!

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  46. Stunning photos, esp. the first one!

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  47. That first photo is a stunner!

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  48. Lovely pics series.
    The fist is my pick.

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  49. love all 3 pics!! super!

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  50. Love that first shot & your entry on the SWF blog is amazing.

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  51. Fabulous shots, and thanks for the additional info on Kyle.

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  52. great capture with the clouds behind the flower. never saw anything like that before.

    mine is here :)
    http://www.mummydiariesblog.com/2008/09/sky-watch-friday-different-side.html

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  53. Fantastic series! My favorite is the third picture. Gorgeous!
    And the first is fantastic by the contrast between flower and cloud!

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  54. Wow..b eautiful... This picture is awesome

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  55. Love the flash on the flower.
    My Skywatch

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  56. Happy Weekend Sky Watching!

    Fabulous photo over at the Sky Watch site


    :-Daryl

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  57. Looks dangerous - nice SWF shot!

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  58. This photo is just as incredible as the one you posted on the SWF site!

    Wonderful!

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  59. Thanks for your comment and yes, the creek is near the street behind our house. The creek flows across our city.

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  60. Very nice photos. I love the depth of the one with the flower.

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  61. Pretty shots we have also a tropical storm yesterday...Now its over.

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  62. Clouds some time look scary this summer in evening there would be thunderheads that never developed in to a storm.
    Clouds do change quickly.

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  63. All your pics are great, but that skywatch one! Whoa! It looks fake, so cool. I am new to Skywatch. It's my second week;) Love it!

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  64. Again, thanks to everyone who offered the wonderful encouragement, kind words, emphatic compliments... you are all so wonderful, and I appreciate you! If you learned something here, I am so glad. I hope you'll return. If you complimented my photography, thanks. I am just so blessed that God graced me with the experience.

    Jess, Watching the birth of a storm is one of my favorite things. Seems like 94L is dumping plenty of rain on our friends in the Carolinas...

    Deirdre, Dewd... love it! Thanks!

    YEGTG, The season's not over yet!

    Tom, I can't tell you how much I appreciate you!

    JoAnn, Be safe sailboating!

    Fishing guy, I see stuff in the clouds... I promise. You've been a great influence.

    Merisi, You're welcome!

    Luiz, Southern Brazil...? Really?

    Ray, Stay dry.

    Jess, Thanks for the heads!!!

    Muge, A humble thanks.

    Coutry Girl, I rock?! :O) THANKS!

    Sandy, Magic?! Thanks be to God.

    Babooshka, Most educational... thank you! A star? Me? Nah... I just love it!

    Peppylady, Yes, they change very quickly.

    Oh, and thank you so much to all those who enjoyed and complimented the Sky watch intro!

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  65. Another Great job! The pictures are just awesome asw usual! I love the one that looks like cottonballs! Great post!

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  66. Wonderful photos. And you are from Georgia! Me too!

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  67. I love the photo of the wisteria with the white clouds in the background! Beautiful!

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  68. Hi Dew Just been checking this links and on Sky Watch and then I noticed how many comments you have had on both your great posts... over 200.. that really dose say it all.... I'm sure many will stick around and follow you following the storms.

    Tom

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  69. Thrilling work you do and wonderful pictures you show to us all, thank you so much.
    I will visit often.
    Thank you for your visit and comment SWF.

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  70. My spelling mistakes are legendary, 'birthing' is what I meant to say.
    That last spectacular photo is like a cumulus cannon ball shooting across the sky leaving a jet stream behind it.

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  71. Thanks to you, Tom. I appreciate it all.

    Arija, I knew what you meant.

    Thanks, everyone!

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  72. I love the additional cumulonimbus pics on your site for SWF.

    Thanks for dropping by The Dinghy Dock.

    As to your comment left there: y'know, it's a bit surprising, but most of the experienced sailors I chat with (and learn from, since I am a bit of a novice) don't seem to know much about clouds... they are all weather geeks, following NOAA and WeatherUnderground multiple times a day, sometimes every 10 minutes if something may possibly be coming in our general direction maybe (even if it is just forming off cape verdes)

    They will know a lot about wind speeds and directions associated with any given weather system and as predicted for the next four or five days, and they can tell you the wind speed within two knots by looking at the waves (I am actually getting the hang of that skill)...

    But I never hear them saying "Oh, what a lovely cirrostratus" or "how interesting we are getting mammatus formations..." (I have learned that my Sept. 19 SWF posting features mammatus clouds)

    Even the old sailing adventure type books I read talk a lot about wind directions, nicknames for certain winds (levanter, mistral etc.), and squalls, storms, cyclones, hurricanes, but they also ignore cloud types and concentrate on wind speed, direction and wave height/period/direction.

    They can tell when a storm is coming, but don't talk much about clouds... except to say "looks nice" or "looks nasty."

    So, yes, I am learning about clouds now, and I am sure I will be able to impress some of the saltier sailors when I can confidently identify them and discuss how they are formed and why we are seeing them at a particular moment.

    At least it might distract them when I get "boom-vangs" and "downhauls" confused!

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  73. Thanks, Captain Ben. What a great comment you left. Wow! I guess people just learn what they need to know for the job at hand. I think it will be helpful though to learn more about the clouds. For instance, you mentioned mammatus clouds. It is highly recommended that aviators avoid mammatus that form under cumulonimbus clouds, as they are generally an indication of a particularly strong storm, though there exist some varying theories as to why and how they form. Check out this link, which talks about mammatus clouds (my favorite clouds) more in depth.

    Thank you for your thorough sharing, and I hope you will learn lots about the cloud for your sake as well as the distraction objective you shared. Clouds really are amazing!

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  74. Ilove the 1st photo!!! It is just perfect.

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Dew comment, please...